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Margaret Atwood

This year we are making nothing but elegies. Do what you are good at, our parents always told us, make what you know. This is what we are making, these songs for the dying. You have to celebrate something. —Margaret Atwood, from “Four Small Elegies,” Two-Headed Poems. (Simon & Schuster March 9, 1981) Advertisements

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Canadian Culture · Canadian Literature · Contemporary · Dystopian · Excerpt · Feminism · Fiction · Passage · Quote · Science Fiction · Speculative Fiction · Utopian

Margaret Atwood

But who can remember pain, once it’s over? All that remains of it is a shadow, not in the mind even, in the flesh. Pain marks you, but too deep to see. Out of sight, out of mind. — Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale. (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, April 25, 2017) Originally published 1985.

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Canadian Culture · Canadian Literature · Classic · Collection · Contemporary · Excerpt · Feminism · Fragment · Poetry

Margaret Atwood

There is always more than you know. There are always boxes put away in the cellar, worn shoes and cherished pictures, notes you find later, sheet music you can’t play. — Margaret Atwood, from “Dancing,” Morning in the Burned House. (Mariner Books; Reprint edition September 16, 1996)

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