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Friedrich Nietzsche

I love the one whose soul is overfull so that he forgets himself, and all things are in him; I love the one who has a free spirit and a free heart: thus his head is only the entrails of his heart, but his heart drives him to go under. — Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spoke… Continue reading Friedrich Nietzsche

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Friedrich Nietzsche

It is vain futility to describe the way you smile; it is mere impossibility to speak at all when you are around. I don’t dare breathe. Keep smiling. I don’t dare move at all. — Friedrich Nietzsche, Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche. (Hackett Publishing Company, Inc.; 2nd edition December 15, 1996)

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Friedrich Nietzsche

I overcame myself, the sufferer; I carried my own ashes to the mountains; I invented a brighter flame for myself. And behold, then this ghost fled from me. — Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra. Translated by Walter Kaufman. (Penguin Books; Later Printing edition March 30, 1978)

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Friedrich Nietzsche

My heartbeat has reached the epitome of rottenness; It is no longer part of my heart. Time for the shadows to come and grab me by the brain. Dearest, I am asking you again: Just how far is the sky? — Friedrich Nietzsche, Selected Letters. (Hackett Publishing Company, Inc.; 2nd edition, December 15, 1996) Originally… Continue reading Friedrich Nietzsche

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Friedrich Nietzsche

Rather the artist’s delight in what becomes, the cheerfulness of artistic creation that defies all misfortune, is merely a bright image of clouds and sky mirrored in a black lake of sadness. — Friedrich Nietzsche, The Birth of Tragedy. (Penguin Classics; unknown edition, January 1, 1994) Originally published 1871.

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