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Emily Dickinson

How many flowers fail in Wood – Or perish from the Hill – Without the privilege to know That they are Beautiful – How many cast a nameless Pod Upon the nearest Breeze – Unconscious of the Scarlet Freight – It bear to other eyes – — Emily Dickinson, from “Fascicle Twenty-Eight, Sheet Three, spring… Continue reading Emily Dickinson

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Emily Dickinson

To wait an Hour – is long – If Love be just beyond – To wait Eternity – is short – If Love reward the end – — Emily Dickinson, from “Fascicle Thirty-Nine, Sheet Four, early 1864,” Emily Dickinson’s Poems As She Preserved Them, ed. Christanne Miller (Belknap, 2016)

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Emily Dickinson

“Hope” is the thing with feathers – That perches in the soul – And sings the tune without the words – And never stops – at all – And sweetest – in the Gale – is heard – And sore must be the storm – That could abash the little Bird That kept so many… Continue reading Emily Dickinson

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Emily Dickinson

Come slowly, Eden! Lips unused to thee, Bashful, sip thy jasmines, As the fainting bee, Reaching late his flower, Round her chamber hums, Counts his nectars–enters, And is lost in balms! — Emily Dickinson, “Come slowly, Eden,” [211], The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson (Little, Brown & Co.,1960)

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Emily Dickinson

I hide myself – within my flower, That fading from your Vase – You – unsuspecting – feel for me – Almost – a loneliness – — Emily Dickinson, from “[I hide myself within my flower],” The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson (Little, Brown, & Company, 1960)

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Emily Dickinson

When the best is gone, I know that other things are not of consequence. The heart wants what it wants, or else it does not care. — Emily Dickinson, Letters of Emily Dickinson: Volume I. (Forgotten Books, November 16, 2016) Originally published September 12th 2013.

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Emily Dickinson

The morns are meeker than they were — The nuts are getting brown – The berry’s cheek is plumper – The Rose is out of town – The maple wears a gayer scarf — The field – a scarlet gown — Lest I sh’d seem old fashioned I’ll put a trinket on! — Emily Dickinson,… Continue reading Emily Dickinson

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American Culture · American Literature · Anthology · Classic · Collection · Compilation · Excerpt · Fragment · Nature · Poetry · Romanticism · Transcendentalism

Emily Dickinson

It might be lonelier without the Loneliness — Emily Dickinson, from “It Might Be Lonelier,” [405], The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Edited by Thomas H. Johnson. (Little,Brown and Company; Eighth printing edition 1960) Originally published 1890.

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American Culture · American Literature · Anthology · Classic · Collection · Compilation · Nature · Poetry · Romanticism · Transcendentalism

Emily Dickinson

The Brain — is wider than the Sky — For — put them side by side — The one the other will contain With ease — and You — beside — The Brain is deeper than the sea — For — hold them — Blue to Blue — The one the other will absorb —… Continue reading Emily Dickinson

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