American Culture · American Literature · Chicago Literary Renaissance · Classic · Collection · Excerpt · Fragment · Passage · Poetry · Pulitzer Prize (1919, 1940, 1951)

Carl Sandburg

Read the dictionary from A to Izzard today. Get a vocabulary. Brush up on your diction. See whether wisdom is just a lot of language. ― Carl Sandburg, from “Is Wisdom a Lot of Language,” Honey and Salt. (Harvest Books; Edition Unstated edition April 12, 1967)

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American Culture · American Literature · Chicago Literary Renaissance · Classic · Collection · Contemporary · Excerpt · Fragment · Passage · Poetry · Traditionalism

Carl Sandburg

I speak of new cities and new people. I tell you the past is a bucket of ashes. I tell you yesterday is a wind gone down, a sun dropped in the west. I tell you there is nothing in the world only an ocean of to-morrows, a sky of to-morrows. — Carl Sandburg, from… Continue reading Carl Sandburg

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American Culture · American Literature · Chicago Literary Renaissance · Classic · Collection · Contemporary · Poetry · Traditionalism

Carl Sandburg

I HAVE ransacked the encyclopedias     And slid my fingers among topics and titles     Looking for you.       And the answer comes slow.     There seems to be no answer.               I shall ask the next banana peddler the who and the why of it.       Or—the iceman with his… Continue reading Carl Sandburg

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American Culture · American Literature · Chicago Literary Renaissance · Classic · Collection · Contemporary · Poetry · Traditionalism

Carl Sandburg

THE fog comes     on little cat feet.       It sits looking     over harbor and city     on silent haunches              and then moves on.     — Carl Sandburg, “Fog,” Chicago Poems. (Dover Publications; Unabridged edition May 20, 1994) Originally published 1916.

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