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Walt Whitman

When I heard the learn’d astronomer; When the proofs, the figures, were ranged in columns before me; When I was shown the charts and the diagrams, to add, divide, and measure them; When I, sitting, heard the astronomer, where he lectured with much applause in the lecture-room, How soon, unaccountable, I became tired and sick;… Continue reading Walt Whitman

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Walt Whitman

You sea! I resign myself to you also … . I guess what you mean, I behold from the beach your crooked inviting fingers, I believe you refuse to go back without feeling of me; We must have a turn together … . I undress … . hurry me out of           sight of the… Continue reading Walt Whitman

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Emily Dickinson

When the best is gone, I know that other things are not of consequence. The heart wants what it wants, or else it does not care. — Emily Dickinson, Letters of Emily Dickinson: Volume I. (Forgotten Books, November 16, 2016) Originally published September 12th 2013.

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American Culture · American Literature · Americana · Cataloguing · Classic · Collection · Colloquial Speech · Free Association · Free Verse · Interior Monologue · Lists · Poetry · Romanticism · Stream of Consciousness · Transcendentalism

Walt Whitman

Oh me! Oh life! of the questions of these recurring, Of the endless trains of the faithless, of cities fill’d with the foolish, Of myself forever reproaching myself, (for who more foolish than I, and who more faithless?) Of eyes that vainly crave the light, of the objects mean, of the struggle ever renew’d, Of… Continue reading Walt Whitman

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