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William Shakespeare

O, hereWill I set up my everlasting rest,And shake the yoke of inauspicious starsFrom this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last!Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O youThe doors of breath, seal with a righteous kissA dateless bargain to engrossing death!  — William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet, Act V, Scene iii

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Blank Verse · British Culture · Drama · Dramaturgy · Elizabethan · English Literature · Excerpt · Fiction · Paraphrase · Passage · Play · Quote · Renaissance · Theatre · Tragedy

William Shakespeare

There lives within the very flame of loveA kind of wick or snuff that will abate it,And nothing is at a like goodness still,For goodness, growing to a plurisy,Dies in his own too much. — William Shakespeare, Hamlet Act IV, Scene vii

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Aeschylus

And even in our sleep pain, which cannot forget, falls drop by drop upon the heart, until, in our own despair, against our will, comes wisdom through the awful grace of God. — Aeschylus, from the chorus in Agamemnon; The Oresteia: Agamemnon; The Libation Bearers; The Eumenides, transl. Robert Fagles (Penguin Classics, 1984)

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William Shakespeare

What a piece of work is a man! How noble inreason, how infinite in faculty! In form and movinghow express and admirable! In action how like an Angel!in apprehension how like a god! The beauty of theworld! The paragon of animals! And yet to me, what isthis quintessence of dust? Man delights not me; no,nor… Continue reading William Shakespeare

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Aeschylus

He who learns must suffer And even in our sleep pain that cannot forget Falls drop by drop upon the heart, And in our own despite, against our will, Comes wisdom to us by the awful grace of God. ― Aeschylus, The Orestei. 458 BCE

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