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Walt Whitman

The past, the future, dwelling there, like space, inseparable together. — Walt Whitman, from “Kosmos,” Leaves of Grass. Originally published: July 4, 1855. Advertisements

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American Culture · American Literature · Americana · Cataloguing · Classic · Collection · Colloquial Speech · Free Association · Free Verse · Interior Monologue · Lists · Poetry · Romanticism · Stream of Consciousness · Transcendentalism

Walt Whitman

Oh me! Oh life! of the questions of these recurring, Of the endless trains of the faithless, of cities fill’d with the foolish, Of myself forever reproaching myself, (for who more foolish than I, and who more faithless?) Of eyes that vainly crave the light, of the objects mean, of the struggle ever renew’d, Of… Continue reading Walt Whitman

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American Culture · American Literature · Americana · Cataloguing · Classic · Collection · Colloquial Speech · Free Association · Free Verse · Interior Monologue · Lists · Poetry · Romanticism · Stream of Consciousness · Traditionalism

Walt Whitman

Here the frailest leaves of me, and yet my strongest-lasting: Here I shade and hide my thoughts—I myself do not expose them, And yet they expose me more than all my other poems. — Walt Whitman, “Here the Frailest Leaves of Me,” Leaves of Grass. Originally published: July 4, 1855

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Virginia Woolf

I can only note that the past is beautiful because one never realises an emotion at the time. It expands later, and thus we don’t have complete emotions about the present, only about the past. ― Virginia Woolf, The Diary of Virginia Woolf, Volume Three: 1925-1930. (Mariner Books; First edition, September 14, 1981)

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