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Samuel Beckett

The tears of the world are a constant quantity. For each one who begins to weep somewhere else another stops. The same is true of the laugh. ― Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot. (Grove Press; 1 edition, May 17, 2011) Originally published 1952. Premiered 5 January 1953 at theThéâtre de Babylone, Paris France.

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William Shakespeare

Our revels now are ended. These our actors, As I foretold you, were all spirits and Are melted into air, into thin air: And, like the baseless fabric of this vision, The cloud-capp’d towers, the gorgeous palaces, The solemn temples, the great globe itself, Ye all which it inherit, shall dissolve And, like this insubstantial… Continue reading William Shakespeare

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Avant-garde · Classic · Drama · Dramaturgy · Excerpt · Fiction · French Culture · Irish Culture · Irish Literature · Modernism · Passage · Philosophy · Play · Postmodernism · Quote · Theatre · Theatre of the Absurd

Samuel Beckett

(Looking at the tree) Pity we haven’t got a bit of rope. ― Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot. (Grove Press; 1 edition, May 17, 2011) Originally published 1952. Premiered 5 January 1953 at theThéâtre de Babylone, Paris France.

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Blank Verse · British Culture · Classic · Drama · Dramatic Monologue · Dramaturgy · Elizabethan · English Literature · Excerpt · Passage · Play · Renaissance · Soliloquy · Theatre · Tragedy

William Shakespeare

The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep; No more; and, by a sleep to say we end The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks That flesh is heir to, ’tis a consummation Devoutly to be wish’d. To… Continue reading William Shakespeare

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