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Mary Oliver

The Oak Tree Loves Patience The oak tree        loves patience, the mountain is        still looking, as it has for centuries,        for a word to say about the gradual way it        slides itself back to the        world below to begin again,        in another life, to be fertile.        When the… Continue reading Mary Oliver

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American Culture · American Literature · Classic · Collection · Modernism · Nature · Poetry · Romanticism · Transcendentalism

Emily Dickinson

The Red Leaves take the Green Leaves place and the Landscape yields. We go to sleep with the Peach in our Hands and wake with the Stone, But the Stone is the pledge of Summers to come—   — Emily Dickinson, [268]. New Poems of Emily Dickinson. (The University of North Carolina Press January 1,… Continue reading Emily Dickinson

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Walt Whitman

It will illustrate one phase of humanity anyhow; how few of life’s days and hours (and they not by relative value or proportion, but by chance) are ever noted. Probably another point too, how we give long preparations for some object, planning and delving and fashioning, and then, when the actual hour for doing arrives,… Continue reading Walt Whitman

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American Literature · Classic · Collection · Inspirational · Motivational · Nature · Poetry · Spirituality

Mary Olive

Sometimes     1.     Something came up     out of the dark.     It wasn’t anything I had ever seen before.     It wasn’t an animal     or a flower,     unless it was both.     Something came up out of the water,     a head the size of a cat     but muddy and… Continue reading Mary Olive

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Henry David Thoreau

A lake is a landscape’s most beautiful and expressive feature. It is Earth’s eye; looking into which the beholder measures the depth of his own nature. ― Henry David Thoreau, Walden. (Princeton University Press; 150th Anniversary edition with a New introduction by John Updike edition April 18, 2004)  Originally published 1854.

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