Contemporary · LGBT · Native-American Culture · Native-American Literature · Open Mic · Performance Poetry · Poetry · Queer · Slam Poetry · Spoken Word Poet

Natalie Díaz

Ode to the Beloved’s Hips Bells are they—shaped on the eighth day—silvered percussion in the morning—are the morning. Swing switch sway. Hold the day away a little longer, a little slower, a little easy. Call to me— I wanna rock, I-I wanna rock, I-I wanna rock right now—so to them I come—struck-dumb chime-blind, tolling with… Continue reading Natalie Díaz

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Linda Hogan

The pull of all water toward the ocean, the hope that somewhere there is a world undisturbed, that when we enter, it closes behind us as if we were never here. Someplace a source, a place without despair, the beginning. — Linda Hogan, from “Sounding the Depths,” Rounding the Human Corners (Coffee House Press, 2008)

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Contemporary · Excerpt · Fragment · Native-American Culture · Native-American Literature · Online Anthology · Online Magazine · Periodical · Poetry

Natalie Díaz

There are wild flowers in my desert which take up to twenty years to bloom. The seeds sleep like geodes beneath hot feldspar sand until a flash flood bolts the arroyo, lifting them in its copper current, opens them with memory— they remember what their god whispered into their ribs: Wake up and ache for… Continue reading Natalie Díaz

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Classic · Collection · Contemporary · Excerpt · Fragment · LGBT · Native-American Culture · Native-American Literature · Poetry · Queer

Natalie Díaz

Despair has a loose daughter. I lay with her and read the body’s bones like stories. I can tell you the year-long myth of her hips, how I numbered stars, the abacus of her mouth. —  Natalie Díaz, from “Prayers or Oubliettes,” When My Brother Was an Aztec. (Copper Canyon Press; 59016th edition May 8,… Continue reading Natalie Díaz

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Louise Erdrich

Life will break you. Nobody can protect you from that, and living alone won’t either, for solitude will also break you with its yearning. You have to love. You have to feel. It is the reason you are here on earth. You are here to risk your heart. You are here to be swallowed up.… Continue reading Louise Erdrich

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