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Friedrich Hölderlin

Even though when I called to you then It was not yet with names, and you Never named me as people do As though they knew one another I knew you better Than I have ever known them. I understood the stillness above the sky But never the words of men. Trees were my teachers… Continue reading Friedrich Hölderlin

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Martin Heidegger

Merely to say the same thing twice—language is language—how is that supposed to get us anywhere? But we do not want to get anywhere. We would like only, for once, to get just to where we are already. — Martin Heidegger, from “Language,” Poetry, Language, Thought. (Harper Perennial Modern Classics; Later Printing Used edition, December… Continue reading Martin Heidegger

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Rainer Maria Rilke

Works of art are of an infinite loneliness … nothing so little to be reached as with criticism. Only love can grasp and hold and be just toward them. — Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters to a Young Poet. (Dover Publications May 8, 2002) Originally published 1929.

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Aphorisms · Classic · Collection · Excerpt · German Culture · German Literature · Non-fiction · Passage · Philosophy · Quote

Franz Kafka

The crows maintain that a single crow could destroy the heavens. There is no doubt of that, but it proves nothing against the heavens, for heaven simply means: the impossibility of crows. — Franz Kafka, The Zürau Aphorisms. (Schocken; 1st American Ed edition, December 26, 2006) Originally published 1931.

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Novalis

Sometimes with the most intense pain a paralysis of sensibility occurs. The soul disintegrates–hence the deadly frost–the free power of the mind–the shattering, ceaseless wit of this kind of despair. There is no inclination for anything any more–the person is alone, like a baleful power–as he has no connection with the rest of the world… Continue reading Novalis

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