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E.E. Cummings

[)when what hugs stopping earth than silent is] )when what hugs stopping earth than silent is more silent than more than much more is or total sun oceaning than any this tear jumping from each most least eye of star and without was if minus and shall be immeasurable happenless unnow shuts more than open… Continue reading E.E. Cummings

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E.E. Cummings

(with her beauty more than snow dexterous and fugitive my very frail lady drifting distinctly, moving like a myth in the uncertain morning, with April feet like sudden flowers and all her body filled with May) — E.E. Cummings, from “Puella Mea,” The Dial, January 1921.

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Samuel Beckett

The tears of the world are a constant quantity. For each one who begins to weep somewhere else another stops. The same is true of the laugh. ― Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot. (Grove Press; 1 edition, May 17, 2011) Originally published 1952. Premiered 5 January 1953 at theThéâtre de Babylone, Paris France.

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E.E. Cummings

i love you much(most beautiful darling) more than anyone on the earth and i like you better than everything in the sky. — E.E. Cummings, from “i love you much(most beautiful darling),” Complete Poems, 1913-1962. (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich; Second Printing edition, 1980)

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Samuel Beckett

Where would I go, if I could go, who would I be, if I could be, what would I say, if I had a voice, who says this, saying it’s me? — Samuel Beckett, Stories and Texts for Nothing. (Grove Press; First Printing edition, January 13, 1994) Originally published January 1st 1974.

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E.E. Cummings

what a wonderful thing is the end of a string (murmurs little you-i as the hill becomes nil) and will somebody tell me why people let go — E.E. Cummings, from “o by the by”, Selected Poems 1923-1958. (Penguin Books, January 1, 1963)

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Samuel Beckett

Vladimir: Did I ever leave you? Estragon: You let me go. ― Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot. (Grove Press; 1 edition, May 17, 2011) Originally published 1952. Premiered 5 January 1953 at theThéâtre de Babylone, Paris France.

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Samuel Beckett

saying again if you do not teach me I shall not learn saying again there is a last even of last times last times of begging last times of loving of knowing not knowing pretending a last even of last times of saying if you do not love me I shall not be loved if… Continue reading Samuel Beckett

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