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Claudia Rankin

Yes, and the body has memory. The physical carriage hauls more than its weight. The body is the threshold across which each objectionable call passes into consciousness-all the unintimidated, unblinking, and unflappable resilience does not erase the moments lived through, even as we are eternally stupid or everlastingly optimistic, so ready to be inside, among,… Continue reading Claudia Rankin

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African-American Culture · African-American Literature · Classic · Collection · Contemporary · Poetry

Tracy K. Smith

When Your Small Form Tumbled into Me I lay sprawled like a big-game rug across the bed: Belly down, legs wishbone-wide. It was winter. Workaday. Your father swung his feet to the floor. The kids upstairs dragged something back and forth On shrieking wheels. I was empty, blown-through By whatever swells, swirling, and then breaks… Continue reading Tracy K. Smith

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African-American Culture · African-American Literature · Anthology · Classic · Collection · Contemporary · Excerpt · Feminism · Fragment · Glbt · Poetry · Race

Audre Lorde

Do not remember me as disaster nor as the keeper of secrets I am a fellow rider in the cattle cars watching you move slowly out of my bed saying we cannot waste time only ourselves. — Audre Lorde, from “Movement Song,” The Collected Poems of Audre Lorde (W. W. Norton and Company Inc. 1997)

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African-American Culture · African-American Literature · Classic · Collection · Contemporary · Poetry

Major Jackson

I’m glum about your sportive flesh in the empire of blab, and the latest guy running his trendy tongue like a tantalizing surge over your molars, how droll. Love by a graveyard is redundant, but the skin is an obstacle course like Miami where we are inescapably consigned: tourists keeping the views new. What as… Continue reading Major Jackson

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