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Oscar Wilde

The final mystery is oneself. When one has weighed the sun in the balance, and measured the steps of the moon, and mapped out the seven heavens star by star, there still remains oneself. Who can calculate the orbit of his own soul? — Oscar Wilde, ”De Profundis,” Originally published: 1905. De Profundis and Other… Continue reading Oscar Wilde

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Blog · Contemporary · Excerpt · Fragment · Nigerian-American Culture · Nigerian-American Literature · Online Journal · Passage · Poetry

Uche Nduka

somewhere behind the napes, armorial backbone. ripeness that goes on and on. a kayak, waist-deep. in blood is where the acorn grows. which means the world is ravenous. i want to eat my cake and have it. lover, am i not your invention? — Uche Nduka, “Somewhere Behind the Napes,” Overpassbooks January 15, 2013

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Classic · Collection · Contemporary · Essay · Excerpt · Inspirational · Lebanese-American Culture · Lebanese-American Literature · Motivational · Passage · Poetry · Religion · Spiritual

Kahlil Gibran

And could you keep your heart in wonder at the daily miracles of your life, your pain would not seem less wondrous than your joy; And you would accept the seasons of your heart, even as you have always accepted the seasons that pass over your fields. And you would watch with serenity through the… Continue reading Kahlil Gibran

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American Culture · American Literature · Classic · Contemporary · Excerpt · Fiction · Historical · Historical Fiction · Mystery · Paraphrase · Passage · Quote · Romance

Robert Goolrick,

Sometimes she sat and let her mind go blank and her eyes go out of focus, so that she watched the slow, jerky movements of the motes that floated across her pupils. They amazed her as a child. Now she saw them as a reflection of how she moved, floating listlessly through the world, occasionally… Continue reading Robert Goolrick,

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