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Katherine Mansfield

It is true when you are by yourself and you think about life, it is always sad. All that excitement and so on has a way of suddenly leaving you, and it’s as though, in the silence, somebody called your name, and you heard your name for the first time. — Katherine Mansfield, from “At… Continue reading Katherine Mansfield

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American Culture · American Literature · Classic · Collection · Confessional · Contemporary · Correspondence · Epistolary · Excerpt · Non-fiction · Paraphrase · Passage · Quote

Charles Bukowski

I must roll another cigarette and watch the blue smoke curl and curl and curl and let myself feel good for a few moments. I never used to let myself feel too good. Now, for some reason, I feel like I deserve to feel good.  — Charles Bukowski, from a letter to Carl Weissner, Screams… Continue reading Charles Bukowski

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American Culture · American Literature · Classic · Collection · Compilation · Contemporary · Excerpt · Fragment · Passage · Poetry · Southern Gothic · Southern Literature

Frank Stanford

I hear birds and whispers Like water gnawing a hull I build a fire In the bottom of my boat A good memory moves me through the current —Frank Stanford, from “If She Lives in the Hills,” What About This: Collected Poems of Frank Stanford (Copper Canyon Press, 2015)

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American Culture · American Literature · Anthology · Classic · Collection · Compilation · Excerpt · Modernism · Passage · Poetry

Wallace Stevens

I measure myself Against a tall tree. I find that I am much taller. For I reach right up to the sun, With my eye; And I reach to the shore of the sea With my ear. Nevertheless, I dislike The way the ants crawl In and out of my shadow. —Wallace Stevens, section III… Continue reading Wallace Stevens

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Percy Bysshe Shelley

A poet is a nightingale, who sits in darkness and sings to cheer its own solitude with sweet sounds. — Percy Bysshe Shelley, from “A Defence of Poetry,” 1820, Toward the Open Field: Poets on the Art of Poetry 1800-1950, ed. Melissa Kwasny (Wesleyan University Press, 2004)

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