Classic · Collection · Contemporary · Italian-Canadian Culture · Italian-Canadian Literature · Poetry

Pier Giorgio di Cicco

I Want You to See I want you to see the hole in my shirt where your heart went through like a Colt 45, and opened a dream at the back of the neck. Here, let me unbutton it for you. Notice the ribs, those sweet things you loved, notice the insides, the parchment lampshades,… Continue reading Pier Giorgio di Cicco

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20th-century Philosophy · Classic · Excerpt · French Culture · French Literature · Non-fiction · Paraphrase · Passage · Phenomenology · Philosophy · Psychology · Quote · Science · Theory · Western Philosophy

Maurice Merleau-Ponty

I know myself insofar as I am inherent in time and in the world, that is, I know myself only in ambiguity. — Maurice Merleau-Ponty, The Phenomenology of Perception, translated by Colin Smit. (Routledge; 2 edition, May 5, 2002)

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American Culture · American Literature · Classic · Collection · Contemporary · Excerpt · Passage · Poetry

Marilyn Hacker

I don’t want to remember you as that four o’clock in the morning eight months long after you happened to me like a wrong number at midnight that blew up the phone bill to an astronomical unknown quantity in a foreign currency. — Marilyn Hacker, from “Nearly a Valediction,” in “Against Elegies,” Winter Numbers: Poems.… Continue reading Marilyn Hacker

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American Culture · American Literature · Catholic · Christianity · Classic · Collection · Contemporary · Essay · Excerpt · Paraphrase · Passage · Quote · Religion · Theology

Thomas Merton

For language to have meaning there must be intervals of silence somewhere, to divide word from word and utterance from utterance. He who retires into silence does not necessarily hate language. Perhaps it is love and respect for language which imposes silence upon him. — Thomas Merton, Disputed Questions. (Harvest Books; 1st Harvest/HBJ ed edition,… Continue reading Thomas Merton

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Classic · Collection · Excerpt · Modernism · Passage · Poetry · Swedish Culture · Swedish Literature

Gunnar Ekelöf

the silence drinks the slow autumn rain which no longer makes anything good grow the folded hands warm each other the stiff looks fade among the live coals — Gunnar Ekelöf, from “Mirrror of October,” Friends, You Drank Some Darkness, Three Swedish Poets: Harry Martinson, Gunnar Ekelöf & Tomas Tranströmer (Beacon Press, 1975)

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